THREE SIGNS IT IS TIME TO REPOT YOUR PLANT

When do you repot your plants? As and when you like? When you find that you're sick of the aesthetics of the existing planter? Or, when you find that your plants need more space or nutrients? In this post, we talk about three definite signs that it is time for you to get your hands dirty (repotting time!).

What happens during repotting is that you are basically providing better conditions for your plants to grow. Most plants require the occasional repotting every 12 to 18 months, but slow-growing varieties can remain in the same planter for at least 2-3 years. Not quite sure what are the signs that it is time for your plant to be repotted? No worries, we’ve got you covered – keep reading.


1. The soil is old

Nutrients are crucial for healthy growth--just like how eating healthy, wholesome food is good for your overall health! When your plant has been in the same soil for a long time, it is likely that most nutrients would have depleted over time. If the soil looks clumpy, consider repotting so that your plant has access to nutrients again. In our experience, we’ve observed that there seems to be a misconception that you should always change out the planter for a bigger one when repotting. That’s not true! Sometimes, the purpose of repotting is to provide more nutrients to your plant babies via new soil.


2. The root system is getting too big for the pot

When the root system is too big for the planter, a couple of things can happen. Firstly, the plant may slowly be pushed out of the pot. This is not great, because over time, your plant can eventually topple over (messy!). Next, your plant may constantly be thirsty due to insufficient soil in the planter. This is because soil holds water and without sufficient soil, your plant will dry out more quickly, leading to you having to water it more frequently.


When the root system is too big for the pot, you can either repot into a bigger pot (recommended!) or trim the roots back (be careful not to trim more than 20% of the existing roots!) so that it can continue fitting into the existing planter.


3. The plant is no longer growing as fast as it used to

It’s a good rule of thumb to assume that the more space that plant has, the more room it has to grow. If you notice that your plant is starting to get root bound and that it is not growing as fast as it used to, it could be because the planter is too small. However, take caution not to put the plant in a planter more than three inches bigger than its rootball. The more excess soil there is, the more water it will hold. If the plant is placed in a planter way bigger than its rootball, it can develop root rot.


If you want your plant to thrive and grow, providing them a good home with tons of nutrients is one of the best things you can do.

There you have it—three good reasons to repot your plants! It is not to say that you absolutely have to repot them; they are unlikely to die if you don’t. However, if you want your plant to thrive and grow, providing them a good home with tons of nutrients is one of the best things you can do.


We are off to repot our plants now (because what else do you do after reading all this?). Till next time, happy planting!

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